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Wedding Industry Trends

wedding album for pro photographer by jd photo imaging labIf you are a wedding photographer, here are some industry trends you may find interesting:

1. In 2014, the average spent on photographer $2,556. Amount spent on videographer: $1,794. Source TheKnot.com.

2. Couples spend on average $1,661 for a wedding photographer, $325 for a Photo DVD, $421 for an engagement session, $234 for prints, and $449 for album(s). Source: CostofWedding.com.

3. “Digital-only” or “digital-plus” events accounted for more than 50% of wedding photography packages sold in the US last year. Source: TheWeddingReport.com.

4. Over 50% of couples will purchase a Photo DVD. About half will purchase an engagement session or prints. Only one-third will purchase an album. Source: CostofWedding.com.

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JD Custom Album Design Service

wedding-albumJD’s Custom Album Design service makes it affordable for you to outsource the entire process of creating a professional wedding album.

See a sample wedding album design online. Note that each design will be unique for your client.

To use our service, drop your images in the JD image drop box via JDLab2You or mail us a CD/DVD. Be sure to include your album type, size, and cover choices in the drop box instructions.

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Diamond Albums with Metallic Paper Are One of a Kind

diamond-metallicIf you’ve been looking for a premium product to offer your wedding clients, why not try a Diamond album with metallic paper?

JD’s Diamond albums are the finest albums available. Each is hand-made from genuine Kodak prints mounted on heavy backing, then finished with rounded edges in a lay-flat design.

When combined with metallic paper, the Diamond album is amazing. It has a look that your clients will not see anywhere else.

To order your Diamond album with metallic paper, simply click the “Page Finish” option after your album is completed in JDLab2You.

Learn more about Diamond albums.

Get started with JDLab2You.

Creating Covers for Albums and Photo Books in JDLab2You

It is easy to create great album covers in JDLab2You if you follow these directions:

1. Decide which of our albums you are going to create: Diamond, Emerald, Sapphire, a hard cover photo book, or a soft cover photo book. Each of these types of albums have different sets of layout guides that you’ll need to use.

2. Download and save the Layout Guides .ZIP file for the type of album you’ll be creating.

3. Open the .ZIP file, and select the .PSD file for the size and cover of the album you’ll be creating.

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Emerald Album Combines Photo Book Cover and Photographic Prints

JD Photo Imaging Emeral AlbumPress-printed photo books are great for senior albums, family albums and many other applications. But customers asked us if we could create a premium photo book that used real photographic prints on Kodak paper.

That’s why we created the Emerald Album.

Each page is printed on photographic paper, then mounted on a thin mount board. This results in an album with all seamless panoramic images, and pages starting on the left side. The front and back inside covers and first pages are white to give the album a finished look.

Emerald album covers are available in black, red or caramel leatherette, or you can create a custom photo cover.

See the Emerald or our complete line of photographic print albums here.

Order the Emerald album using our ROES software.

6 (Simple) Steps to a Successful Wedding Photography Sale

(c) Same SarkisWhen you run a photo lab, you get to talk with photographers. Lots of them. And after a while, you begin to see patterns that the most successful (i.e. profitable) ones have in common.

When it comes to wedding photographers, the most successful ones I’ve talked to use the K.I.S.S. (keep it simple, stupid) principle. They have figured out that although a bride may seem to want a million options, what the photographer provides is what she really needs: stress-free and confusion-free photography on her wedding day – and when it comes time to select prints and purchase the album.

These are the 6 (simple) steps to a successful wedding photography sale:

1. Sell yourself on the phone. Offer a free consultation at her convenience. Avoid quoting prices. If asked, stick with “we work with your budget.” If she’s unwilling to come in, get her email and immediately send her a link to your website. Make sure it has lots of examples and testimonials from other brides.

2. Sell yourself at the consultation. Show 2-3 great sample albums, no more. Sell yourself again. Promise that you will reduce stress and confusion, and make the photography fun. Offer three prices points: a “budget”, the “most popular” (what you really want to sell), and a “deluxe” package. Get a deposit.

3. Shoot the wedding. Take charge by making suggestions, not demands. You’re the wedding expert. Look, dress and act the part. Leave cards on the tables for guests to go online and purchase prints. Images online should be the same ones you’ll show the bride for the album – don’t put all your images online.

4. Present the images. In-studio shows on a big screen are best, right after the honeymoon. At this point, you’re selling a dream, not a product. Show the couple only the best images that tell the story, about 25% more than they ordered. The average album has 120 images – never show more than 150. Let them cull out the unwanted images. If they cannot, offer an upgrade package. Reveal a “holy smokes” shot to end on a high note – and to offer as a wall portrait later.

5. Sell the album. Stick to the “Rule of 3”. Bring out 3 samples: good, better, best. Bring out 2 colors, black or brown. Bring out 3 sizes, 8×10, 10×10, 11×14. Don’t make a complicated grid of options that change the prices.

Complete steps #4 and #5 in 90 minutes or less.

6. Deliver the album. You should have the album built and returned to the bride within 4 weeks of their wedding while she is still excited. The sooner the better.

While you can be a successful wedding photographer without this list, I guarantee if you try it you’ll have even more success than before.

(image courtesy of Sam Sarkis)

Agree or disagree? Leave a comment below and share your thoughts with other wedding photographers.